David E. Oji M.D

Dr. Oji will be changing his practice to Stanford Healthcare in Redwood City, Palo Alto, and Los Gatos. He will be resuming his practice the week of June 5th. If you need immediate care, please contact Tri-Valley Orthopedics to be seen by his formers partners. If you have a complex foot and ankle problem that requires specialized care in the East Bay, please locate the nearest M.D. Orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeon.

New Practices

Los Gatos Stanford Orthopaedic Surgery Clinic

555 Knowles Dr #211, Los Gatos, CA 95032
Tel: 408-866-6651

Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center

Foot and Ankle Services
450 Broadway, Redwood City, CA 94063
Tel: Return patient: 650-723-5643
New Patient: 650-498-7555

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Hammertoe

A hammertoe is a deformity of a lesser toe (second through fifth toes), where the toe gets bent upward at the toe’s middle joint, resembling a hammer. The bent portion may rub against a shoe causing pain, irritation and development of corns. It is caused by wearing shoes that are too tight or narrow near the toes, when the second toe is larger than the first, and as a complication of arthritis and certain neuromuscular conditions.

Early stages of hammertoe are flexible and may be treated by conservative measures such as strapping, padding and wearing appropriate footwear. In more severe cases and when conservative treatment does not help, surgical correction is indicated. Surgery may include a tendon transfer procedure, where a tendon is rearranged from the lower side of the toe to the top, to pull the bent joint down and straighten the toe.

Stiff or fixed hammertoes may be corrected by joint resection or joint fusion (permanent straightening of the toe), which involves cutting tendons and ligaments of the joint and removing part of the bone to help straighten the joint. The straightened toe is held by pins for 3-4 weeks following surgery. Hammertoe correction is usually performed under local anesthesia on an outpatient basis.

There may be some swelling, redness, and stiffness following surgery. A special shoe may be provided to help with walking. As with any surgical procedure, hammertoe correction may be associated with a few risks including infection, bleeding, nerve injury or poor alignment of the toe.


 

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